link the world

nature and society
what happens in an Internet Minute

what happens in an Internet Minute

Dataminr : tool to mining twitter’s data

Dataminr : tool to mining twitter’s data

Targeting Tumors With Electricity

txchnologist:

image

by Karin Heineman, Inside Science

The days of summer vacation and fun in the sun may be over for the season, but the hours spent in the sun over the last several months can take a toll on your skin. More than 120,000 new cases of melanoma, a very serious form of skin cancer, are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.

Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer and if not treated early, can spread through the body.

Now, doctors are using electricity to help kill late-stage melanoma tumors.

Read More

wearable fray

wearable fray

5 Crazy Ways Social Media Is Changing Your Brain Right Now

The Filter Bubble, Eli Pariser

Every technology has an interface, Stanford law professor Ryan Calo told me, a place where you end and the technology begins. And when the technology’s job is to show you the world, it ends up sitting between you and reality, like a camera lens. That’s a powerful position, Calo says. “There are lots of ways for it to skew your perception of the world.” And that’s precisely what the filter bubble does.

source : The Filter Bubble, Eli Pariser

typography

typography

thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants
Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.
Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?

thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants

Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.

Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?