link the world

nature and society

The Filter Bubble, Eli Pariser

Every technology has an interface, Stanford law professor Ryan Calo told me, a place where you end and the technology begins. And when the technology’s job is to show you the world, it ends up sitting between you and reality, like a camera lens. That’s a powerful position, Calo says. “There are lots of ways for it to skew your perception of the world.” And that’s precisely what the filter bubble does.

source : The Filter Bubble, Eli Pariser

typography

typography

thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants
Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.
Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?

thisbigcity:

nybg:

A Brief Survey of Vertical Gardens, Skyscrapers, and Edible Restaurants

Notice the bevy of green architectural concepts floating around the internet? I don’t mean the office building proposals with low carbon footprints, or novel approaches to solar farms. I’m talking about literal green concepts—bringing the bounty of the farm to urban landscapes.

Flavorwire has put together a stack of innovative and inspiring “plant buildings,” all with one thing in common: they’re taking after Patrick Blanc in a big way. Thanks to the French botanist’s Orchid Show designs here at the NYBG, New Yorkers are getting a taste of his creative ambition. The Green Man’s vertical gardens, or mur végétal, have directly or indirectly inspired everything from skyscraper farms to edible restaurants, and the author phrases Blanc’s legacy succinctly.

" … Our favorite green-haired botanist has helped to usher in the post-industrial era’s successor—a new design epoch that we think should be classified as The Age of the Plant."

Click through for a few of the more daring ideas being courted in countries around the world. —MN

How many of these ideas have been realized or are in the process of this? Any vertical gardens in your city?

pbsnature:

Those talons are comin’ for ya! Have you been watching #EARTHFLIGHT on NATURE on PBS and online? http://to.pbs.org/1ulDhMw
 

pbsnature:

Those talons are comin’ for ya! Have you been watching #EARTHFLIGHT on NATURE on PBS and online? http://to.pbs.org/1ulDhMw

 

How to get your first Tattoo

Ready to get inked ? I’ll show you how to do some research before getting that needle plied to your skin.

Things You’ll Need:

  • A current phone book is a great start. A couple of Tattoo magazines,people that you know who have ink on themselves. Local shops.

Step1

Make sure this is something you really want. Once that ink is on, its on! Yeah,the tat can be removed but it will also leave a scar. So,be sure you want one and don’t put a tattoo on that looks really stupid! Believe me you will regret it later.Finally be sober when you do this. I have seen images that would have been alot different had that person been sober.

Step2

Do your homework! Ask questions,you can never know too much.Most cities have at least one tattoo shop/parlor in them. If not, prepare to do a little driving. Check out their flash(images up on the studio walls) or an artist will have a picture album of work that they have done. Go to as many of these studios as you can.

Step3

When you have decided on the artist you want to do the work for you, make sure the shop is clean. A place that isn’t clean should give you pause. Surgical gloves,needles in unopened containers,cleaning equipment are all positive things to see in a studio.

Step4

Tattooing is an art, that means its subjective. The design you choose is for you. You are the one that has to live with it. Make sure you love the design, colors, and workmanship on the tattoo before having it permanently put on your skin.

Tips & Warnings

  • If you are not sure where to put your first tattoo, put it where it won’t be seen. That means put it where clothing usually covers an area.IE…wear a T-shirt to cover a tattoo on your shoulder.Wear a sleeveless shirt to show it off. In time if you found that you enjoy the tattoo process put them anywhere you want.

  • How’s your threshold of pain? I’ve seen small women take tattoos as tough as a navy seal.I have also seen big bad tough guys faint within a few minutes of the needle touching their skin. Some say its not so bad, while others say it hurts like hell. Everyone is different, so start with a small tattoo if you are unsure.